Treeline iPhone Project Covid-19

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Treeline iPhone Project Covid-19

In Lockdown I recently took up running and completed my first 10K milestone (gasping still). Most probably not going to reach out to marathon runners and join their club if you don’t mind, it’s just a way of keeping fit and filling some of the time. Whilst I have plenty to do I have thought much along the lines that maybe a project of some description. I am attracted to nature and love a nice tree! I have a few Oaks near to me. That rhymes I think!

No campaigns or locations and in Lockdown! No editing or post-production to finish, I need to be involved in something that’s remotely creative…

On my run early on this year I noticed this bear Oak and thought to document this might be interesting. I normally take my phone with me in case I keel over but of course, I can also these takes take pictures 🙂

Interesting how the baron Skeletal tree has more artistic merit than the fully blossomed tree at the bottom of the Journal. Singularity and painterly. I found or find this tree inspirational and happened to document a month’s growth into full bloom.

Note – “Oaks are monoeciousmeaning that each individual tree has both male and female flowers on it.”

I am now using a super App – [Get in touch if you would like to know the app] more for my editing, previously using Lightroom, and still doing so but this new App is slightly easier and better equipped for a quick edit. I also tend to use the App called Snapseed which I have used for a long time. It has a comprehensive set of editing tools. In my YouTube channel will b letting on about the App as it features in one of my recent trips to Scotland in the snow.

Here is the link to the App   https://apple.co/2LxNOVk

Not the Trail of the Lonesome pine! For weeks I have passed by and gathered a selection of iPhone images s a record of new life and all the greatness we take for granted. Tree hugger, I am not but an appreciation of nature which last longer I am. This skeletal rendition of two and a half appeals in a way as this is the first time I have actually looked at one item other than my Imac and camera more than once or twice.

Another App you may find interesting is Darkroom – Very powerful and also has a vast array of editability, it also comes with great colour washes if you need them. Not applicable in this set of images.

Editing for me has much of the time been done in Photoshop, Lightroom and now on the iPhone in App form. I have customised my smart devices to both edit video and edit pictures on the fly and the apps used help get mobile and upload quickly.

My INSTAGRAM for any images outside of my general photography is actually called @silvergumtypethis is all of my observations and diversions edited on my apps and not seen anywhere else.

There is quite a quick turn around once the tree hits the budding stage and with March/April being one of the best so far, growth was pretty zippy. In fact, I had to go out three times a week to capture the best bits and not miss the action. Capturing this was technically tricky lining up the same shot handheld. I think I have managed to get close enough to get the effect of a series without offering 100 shots.

This shot above is pre- Pig Poo heaven, Last week just after my last shot, the farmer coated the field in a brown fluffy stagnant slurry, pigs dung everywhere. The whole look changed, brown was even deeper brown. The pictures also show how sunny the month was, normally grey clouds and wet but not this time. Poo everywhere and a sickly smell means it’s pigs!!
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Not the Trail of the Lonesome pine! For weeks I have passed by and gathered a selection of iPhone images s a record of new life and all the greatness we take for granted. Tree hugger, I am not but an appreciation of nature which last longer I am. This skeletal rendition of two and a half appeals in a way as this is the first time I have actually looked at one item other than my Imac and camera more than once or twice.

More about Oaks I found out.

Oaks are monoecious, meaning that each individual tree has both male and female flowers on it. The flowers appear about 7-14 days after the leaves burst, and the male flowers consist of drooping, tassel-like catkins, up to 4 cm. long. The female flowers are tiny and occur at the leaf axils, where the leaf stalks join the twigs. Each catkin releases several million pollen grains which are distributed by the wind and, when pollination is successful, adhere to the receptive stigma on the female flowers. Fertilised flowers develop into acorns, which ripen in the autumn and are up to 3 cm. long. The acorns are seated in hard, warty cups called cupules, and in pedunculate oak, these are borne on stalks called peduncles, which are up to 8 cm. long. By contrast, the acorns of durmast oak are either stalkless or have very short stalks less than 0.3 cm. long, and it is this sessile feature that gives this species its common name.

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